All you need to know about Inflatable kayaks

By Tory Reiss / September 10, 2016

Modern kayaks have evolved into specialized types that may be broadly categorized according to their application as sea or touring kayaks, whitewater (or river) kayaks,surf kayaks, racing kayaks, fishing kayaks, and recreational kayaks. The broader kayak categories today are ‘Sit-In’, which is inspired mainly by traditional kayak forms, ‘Sit-On-Top’ (SOT), which evolved from paddle boards that were outfitted with footrests and a backrest, ‘Hybrid’, which are essentially canoes featuring a narrower beam and a reduced

The broader kayak categories today are ‘Sit-In’, which is inspired mainly by traditional kayak forms, ‘Sit-On-Top’ (SOT), which evolved from paddle boards that were outfitted with footrests and a backrest, ‘Hybrid’, which are essentially canoes featuring a narrower beam and a reduced free board enabling the paddler to propel them from the middle of the boat, using a double blade paddle (i.e. ‘kayak paddle’), and twin hull kayaks offering each of the paddler’s legs a narrow hull of its own. In recent decades, kayaks design have proliferated to a point where the only broadly accepted denominator for them is their being designed mainly for paddling using a kayak paddle featuring two blades i.e. ‘kayak paddle’. However, even this inclusive definition is being challenged by other means of

In recent decades, kayaks design have proliferated to a point where the only broadly accepted denominator for them is their being designed mainly for paddling using a kayak paddle featuring two blades i.e. ‘kayak paddle’. However, even this inclusive definition is being challenged by other means of

However, even this inclusive definition is being challenged by other means of human powered propulsion, such as foot activated pedal drives combined with rotating or sideways moving propellers, electric motors, and even outboard motors.

 

Inflatables

also known as the duckies or IKs, can usually be transported by hand using a carry bag. They are generally made of hypalon (a kind of neoprene), Nytrylon (a rubberized fabric), PVC, or polyurethane coated cloth. They can be inflated with foot, hand or electric pumps. Multiple compartments in all but the least expensive increase safety. They generally use low pressure air, almost always below 3 psi.

While many inflatables are non-rigid, essentially pointed rafts, best suited for use on rivers and calm water, the higher end inflatables are designed to be hardy, seaworthy vessels. Recently some manufacturers have added an internal frame (folding-style) to a multi-section inflatable sit-on-top kayak to produce a seaworthy boat.

The appeal of inflatable kayaks is their portability, their durability (they don’t dent), ruggedness in white water (they bounce off rocks rather than break) and their easy storage. In addition, inflatable kayaks generally are stable, have a small turning radius and are easy to master, although some models take more effort to paddle and are slower than traditional kayaks.

Because inflatable kayaks aren’t as sturdy as traditional, hard-shelled kayaks, a lot of people tend to steer away from them. However, there have been considerable advancements in inflatable kayak technology over recent years.

 

 

About the author

Tory Reiss

Hi! I'm Tory Reiss. I built this blog to share my fitness quest and provide informative reviews of fitness equipment, gadgets, and supplements that you can use to help reach your health goals. Hope you enjoy it!